Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Kaleidoscope of Butterflies #13

Cathy and I use this monthly linkup to spread the word about butterflies, their beauty, and what we can do to keep them around. While this may not be the month to see many in our areas, we can start some preparations for spring.

If you don't already have milkweed plants, this is a good time to purchase seeds since cold stratification helps them germinate. Here's a good article on growing milkweed from seed.

Save Our Monarchs is currently offering asclepias incarnata milkweed seeds free. Please add a donation so they can continue their efforts. This variety (swamp milkweed) is native to parts of eastern Canada and the lower 48 except the Pacific coast states, Arizona, and Mississippi. See this map for details.

If you check reputable suppliers in your area you'll be doing the greatest good. Buying varieties that are native to your county means they bloom at the "right" time encouraging butterfly migration. Those butterflies have a long journey and need sustenance all along the way. Although the article speaks about Texas varieties, the principle applies everywhere. Here's a list of varieties found in different states.

On the quilting front, the first sawtooth border is sewed to my latest spiderweb. It's looks much better than the original layout after culling the "wider" triangles. There were too many itty bitty triangles to move but I intended to preview some type of floater border once the strip was sewed. In my rush to "get to a stopping point" I forgot. On balance, I'm okay with this. A yellow floater would just make these triangle points a bit further from the vines. A contrasting floater would add emphasis where it's not needed. That's my story now because I'm not unsewing this row.  :-)

While spiderweb is not a kaleidoscope, it's made with a kaleidoscope ruler. And I'm really trying to focus on one project at a time. Well, one and one UFO and one new top. Unless I get sidetracked. Squirrel!

Spiderweb with first sawtooth border attached
I found the limit of my kitchen floor. Not sure where I will be able to take a photo next.

These pretty butterfly fabrics made their way into the triangles.

Butterfly fabrics used in spiderweb
Cathy has a charming tutorial to create butterflies from waste triangles. Take a look.

Enjoy the day, Ann

26 comments:

  1. Perhaps the quilt shall need to move outdoors for its next photo op? My big quilts have to lay on a sheet on the driveway . . .

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    1. Dappled light out there. Not sure where I will go.

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  2. I love that red butterfly fabric! Thanks for the links to the Save our Monarchs site. I emailed them with several questions I have.

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    1. I'm glad you have questions for them. Thanks for helping.

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  3. This is where I usually resort to the washing line. I wish we had monarchs here.

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    1. Somehow my neighborhoods always prohibit clotheslines. Last one I recall was at my grandparent's. I wish. Sun dried sheets smell so good.

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  4. I was really not liking the triangle border the first post you showed.....I was really for another yellow...something...but it is really growing on me. Glad you did not follow my suggestion...it is looking GREAT!

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    1. Thanks. I didn't like what showed in the first post either but wanted to work it through.

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  5. Haha, that turquoise fabric looks familiar! The sawtooth border looks great all tidied up and sewn in. The larger one will finish it off nicely!

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    1. When I bought it I didn't think it was that distinctive. More like a blender. But we both recognize "our fabrics" wherever they pop up. I have great hopes for the next border.

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  6. and are you up on the counter to take the picture? :-) It's looking good!! Hugs, H in Healdsburg

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    1. On a ladder hanging on the the refrigerator for balance and wondering how I get myself into these positions.

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  7. I love your quilt and the photo adventure, good for you! But don't hurt yourself.

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    1. The things we do for love and quilting.

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  8. Those butterfly fabrics are beautiful!

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    1. I agree. I had to buy them even though there's little room for anything new until I finish older stuff.

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  9. Beautiful quilt, which shows off your love of your craft and passion for butterflies.

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  10. Looks like you had to get creative to take that picture of the quilt in the kitchen! I don't have a lot of floor space these days either. Love that triangle border right next to the vine. It might have been oversight, but it looks great, no need to change it out at all!

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    1. Yes. But that room has the best light. Oh, what we do for our kids and our quilts. :-)
      I'm glad you feel the same way about my progress. Thanks, Audrey.

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  11. Thank you for posting about spiderwebs! My cobwebs grow as I quilt instead of housework.

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    1. Ha! You're right; I have quilt cobwebs and house cobwebs... And sometimes some in my head.

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  12. Ann, I learn something about butterflies every time I read one of these posts. I wish I had something to add to the collective good, but I don't have much, except that I have always had birds, bees, and butterflies flowers. Thanks for the links...they will come in handy this spring!

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    1. How kind of you to write and to have flowers to feed these small creatures. Enjoy the links.

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  13. Oh, gee. I just now found your post and AHIQ. [Bloglovin' works in mysterious ways to let me know about new posts. I haven't figured out what the mysterious ways are.] I will do my darndest to remember the fourth Tuesday linkup. I have just bought Rayna Gillman's and Cindy Grisdela's improv books (actually, I mistakenly bought two copies of each) those, along with my recent spare parts flimsy, have me planning more improv projects.

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    1. Both those books are great for encouraging improvisation. Enjoy.

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