Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Circular Anomaly Fused

There's not a lot of time right now and I don't feel very creative or original but several workshop projects are sitting around. So I can continue to push these partially finished tops and UFOs along. For example, fusible interfacing was ironed to all the second layer pieces of Circular Anomaly as each was pinned in place. They should be fused before pieces get lost or start fraying. Here's a late-night photo I took in December but never posted.

Circular Anomaly layout

I started fusing that layer in the top right. Although the ironing time spread over several days, it only took 2-3 hours to arrange and press that quarter. And fortunately I took breaks because there seem to be too few red circles.

What about this instead? I switched out about ten kisses although some are partial (on the border.)

Circular Anomaly fused

I'd use more circles in the top left but I want to highlight that rose. Remember? And in middle on the left is a wonderful scrap of blue circles that screams for kisses around it. Those are my limiting features.

Next step is topstitching all those hugs and kisses. Since this might be a lap or toddler quilt, satin stitch will not be a choice but I am considering blanket stitch. I don't have the energy for creative thinking or the time to try different stitches right now but this will be a good one to work on in a couple of months.

Enjoy the day, Ann

30 comments:

  1. I love your color choice in this quilt--really lovely work--what did you use for fusing material? I have never done any fusing--sounds intriguing...I always worried about my needle getting all gummed up--hugs, Julierose

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    1. I think it was featherweight Pelion fusible. Not home right now though. It’s interesting because there’s paper on the back which makes it easy to draw a design and cut it out.
      I worry that it will come unstuck after a while but... this was Louisa Smith’s workshop and I just followed directions for once. ;-)

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  2. ages ago I took a class on making a "junk" vest: we cut out the base of our pattern in fabric, and then scattered scraps of fabric and embellishments all over. then, we laid a piece of netting on it- the thin, softer stuff, and quilted it. would that work? or give the look you're looking for? (the netting was hardly visible, amazingly!)

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    1. I’ve worked with netting, too. It’s lovely but not sure how it would last in a quilt being used by a kid. This was a Louisa Smith workshop so I followed her directions.

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  3. I admire your determination. This arrangement is so absorbing and it looks quite complicated to get just right. It turned out lovely.

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    1. Eveyone’s turned out well. I think we all had beautiful fabric. Louisa is an excellent teacher.

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    1. Thanks, Julie. I need them. It’s been a sad time.

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  5. For real? It’s absolutely gorgeous!

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    1. Thank you. It’s a workshop by Louisa Smith.

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  7. I know some people think aqua/red blends are too trendy for words, but this has such a happy feel to it. Love the gradation of color use and the fabric prints are spot on. Isn't it marvelous to have projects already started and at the point of only requiring a bit of effort, but not real creative thinking? I think that's why I like having hand quilting ready to go at a moments notice. Hope you can find some peace in the busywork. Take care and don't worry about keeping the blog super current. We're not likely to go away anytime soon.:)

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    1. I chose them because they were the largest color groups in my stash and I was determined not to buy more... although I did collect a few from friends. I do think it will evoke this decade but it looks happy to me, too. Right now I'm so glad to have these partially completed projects. I wake up in the middle of the night and just need something mindless to soothe my crazy thoughts. Thanks, Audrey.

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  8. This is lovely, the colours, the shapes! Is it raw edges? Generally I am not a fan of satin stitch anyway, blanket stitch is more forgiving. Or straight stitch or running stitch if you are happy to have some fraying with use? Gorgeous anyway, it will be so wonderful when finished. Do take care with the fused pieces of you are handling the piece a lot, they may need the odd press to fuse now and then.

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    1. Thanks, Sandra. It is raw edge. Not my favorite but I frequently use it anyway. Thanks for the tip about re-pressing and confirming my opinion of satin vs blanket stitches.

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    1. Louisa Smith left Denver just before you arrived. But she probably returns for workshops. Keep an eye out.

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  10. The progression of color...I like this so much!

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    1. Thanks, Deb. It was fun to work out but I'm grateful to be at a relatively mindless point right now. Just need something to soothe me back to sleep in the middle of the night.

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  11. Ah yes I do remember this, and loved how it was going! It looks so very 'balanced' and I'm finding something calming about it (maybe the repetitive circles? the graduation of colours?) despite the bright colours.

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    1. Thanks, Linda. I hadn't thought of it as calming but it isn't as loud as the colors suggest. Interesting to consider why.

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  12. Your fabrics and layout really create an illusion of depth...it is spectacular!! My eyes just keep dancing all over as the colors/values/shapes magically shift. Good luck with all that top stitching!!!

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    1. Thanks, Mel. It was a wonderful workshop and so exciting to make a trompe l'oeil from fabric. Yes, I'm not ready to face the top stitching. Saving that treat for later. Ha.

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  13. I traced out a bunch of hugs and kisses on the pellon fusible stuff, fused to fabrics, and cut them all out at least 2 months ago. I'm embarrassed to say that I can't find my book now...it's somewhere in my house but is "missing". Seeing your quilt makes me want to look harder to find it!

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    1. Well, that certainly happens to me. All the time. I hope you find yours soon so we can all see how you lay it out.

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  14. This does have a lovely feel to it, and it's such a clever technique. I like how it's evolved a lot, though don't envy you all the top stitching.

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    1. Darn, Kaja. I was hoping you’d volunteer to do that stitching. Haha. It will be good mindless work. I need that now.

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  15. Fantastic quilt design!! I've never seen anything like it. I love the way the red circles overlap the others.

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