Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Farmhouse Quilt Finished

"You can't be both awesome and negative.
Choose one."

Evidence indicates I will never have a stash of finished baby quilts. They leave as soon as the the final strings are buried. In the meanwhile, time is passing and the farmhouse quilt will be gifted next month. You may have noticed I'm working to the deadline... as usual.

This scrap quilt alternates Log Cabin and split Ohio Star blocks to create a straight furrow design diagonally across the surface.
Farmhouse quilt - Log Cabin and split Ohio Star blocks

I was amused to see Julie's latest quilt because we both quilted freehand Baptist Fans. Is that an example of great minds thinking alike? A few years ago Julie gave me the courage to try fans again when she shared some tips. Her post with all the details came while I was out sick but it’s here. Take a look and then try it yourself. I never mark them because it's always hard to see them on my quilts - unless they are so dark they never come out. And somehow, mine always come out larger, 6-8 inches. Four-inch fans would be easier to quilt. My new goal. 8-)

The folded quilt shows part of the front, the back's print of blue pines in the snow, and the dark blue floral binding. The Baptist fan quilting is visible, too.
Detail of binding and backing of Farmhouse quilt

There are a few dark blue plaids and stripes in my stash that looked terrible next to this lovely ikat border. I finally dug one plain dark grey-blue with enough yardage to complete the binding. Hooray.

Previous Posts:
1. Starting to piece Ohio Star blocks
2. Blocks sewn
3. Top bordered

Quilt Specifics
Size: 66"x76"
Design: Log Cabin and Split Ohio Star
Batting: Pellon 100% cotton
Thread: Gutermann 50 wt light blue cotton
Quilting: Free motion Baptist Fans
Approximate yardage: 8.75 yd


Off the Bookshelf
I knew William Smith as one of the founders of geology who developed the science of stratigraphy and created the first national geologic map in 1815. His greatest accomplishment was recognizing the continuity of the rock formations and confirming that by the specific fossils within. Fossil collecting was a stylish pastime but no one else bothered to actually relate them to the rocks where they were found nor to relate one outcrop of a rock to any other location. Simon Winchester wrote his biography with The Map that Changed the World and the cover of my copy opens to a replica of his famous map. Smith was a blacksmith's son with modest education who faced many difficulties getting recognition for his work which still hangs today at the Geologic Society of London.

The Map that Changed the World by Simon Winchester

FUR or Fabric Use Rate Update
Five finished quilts = 21 yards. Two dresses and one shirt = 11.5 yards {which includes some preliminary muslins.} Sixteen linen hand towels. I also donated 6.5 yards of fabric. Total FUR = 39 yards.

Enjoy the day, Ann

24 comments:

  1. Your quilt is so lovely...and your quilting came out beautifully--you do such nice work Ann..hugs, Julierose

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  2. The farmhouse quilt turned out fabulous! Congratulations on another finish. I am sure you will keep plugging away to try and get a stash of baby quilts. After all you are using up some of that fabric that needs to be made into quilts! Once I get back to those baby quilts I was working on I am going to try out the Baptist fan quilting design. A baby quilt would be perfect for practicing the design. I have done a Baptist fan type design free motion before, but in a border so that every other fan went the opposite direction.

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    1. I'm glad to have it finished before the deadline. We are all getting together soon and this way I can bring it rather than mail it. Yes, I will keep trying to build up a stash of baby quilts. I guess I'm lucky they move out so quickly. I could have a stash and no one to gift them to. Baby quilts are the perfect place to try anything new or use up anything extra. I made fee motion Baptist fans years ago on a quilt that went to Paducah. It was the weak part of that quilt. But Julie's advice strengthened my resolve to try them again and they are much better. I hop you give it a try soon.

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  3. Oh my, your quilt turned out beautifully! Just love it, and I'm certain that you do too.

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    1. Thanks, Marie. I think my SIL will love it and that's the best part.

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  4. I just love that farmhouse quilt. It's so rich in color although it's all blue. What a study in tone and contrast. LeeAnna

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    1. It was fun to work with {mainly} fabrics she chose. I did throw a few in, too. It does make a good color study, doesn't it?

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  5. I love the stars and logs quilt. Shades of blue and white always seems so peaceful and the pattern is interesting too! I know it's hard to keep baby quilts "in stock" but being a piecer more than quilter I just keep making tops. Then when I need a baby quilt I choose one that suits and quilt it. It does not really call for anything fancy?! Interesting Book I love maps! I still get them out for road trips. I have a hard time relating to the small screen version. cheers!

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    1. Blue and white is always peaceful. It's my favorite dishes, too. I liked mixing these two blocks and should do that more often.
      Tops might be the way to go but I can wait a long time to quilt. I'm finding it better to get several tops ready and then have a basting and quilting fest. And you're right, the older I get the simpler my quilting becomes.
      I prefer paper maps, too, but it's harder and harder to find them.

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  6. Great machine quilting and piecing, Ann. And I've said it before, blue and white are so classic, always good together.
    Thanks for the book recommendation.

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    1. Thanks, Janie. I like the combination of colors and blocks and am extra glad to have it done. We are visiting soon and I can take it with me.

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  7. This quilt has such a gentle soft look, this classic block variation is just wonderful.

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    1. Thanks, Pat. We often forget to combine blocks and it changes the look tremendously.

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  8. Thanks for the book recommendation. Winchester is such a good writer! (We enjoyed both Atlantic and Pacific.)
    The quilt is lovely. The blues are calming and the whites/lights add sparkle. I'll need to try freehand fans.

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    1. I haven't read his other books but am looking for them now. Thanks for that reminder.
      The older I get, the less I like marking. I think the fans work well as long as you keep the arcs small enough to stay under the throat.

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  9. I especially like the little corner view of the quilt {call me crazy}. Those triangles are just so intriguing. Great color combo all in all. This has turned out really well!

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    1. That's one of my favorite shots, too. I like seeing the front and back as well as a close up of one of the blocks. It's so pretty I may need a blue and white one for myself. Ha.

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  10. I love it! So very pretty...baby quilts are on my mind right now too!

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    1. Thanks, Julie. Baby quilts are so easy and fast to make, aren't they?

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  11. Congratulations on the finish - your fans look super! And thanks for sharing the link to the post on how to quilt them. The more the merrier!!

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    1. Thank you for sharing your tips. I'm sorry I didn't notice your post but hopefully many more will start fanning themselves. ;-)

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