Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Restart

"Progress is not created by contented people."
~Frank Tyger

Frank may be correct but taking this top apart is a funny sort of progress. And that's what I'm doing. Fortunately not all the seams are sewn but it's still a lot. Why? Because I'm very unhappy with the result.

It's not visible in this photo but there is no way to press the compass seams flat. They must twist or create a gigantic lump at the post or the point. If they twist, there's a dimple in the seam, especially because of the solid background. Even though I trimmed carefully, the points seem to wobble around although that may be an artifact of the seam/pressing issues.

The white sashing has four-pointed stars of pale green prints around purple posts
Testing compass sashing on Shadow Star quilt blocks

My choices are to force my way ahead {and continue to be dissatisfied} or to back up. I choose to back up. I intend to have this long arm quilted by a friend and she will make something beautiful in all the white space. A better solution than continuing with lumps and bumps that will make the quilting more difficult.

But oh, how I hate to rip all those seams and toss this idea.

Reading
The cover of the book, The Thief shows an amulet in a pair of handsBecause Megan Whalen Turner just published her sixth book in the Queen's Thief series, I'm rereading all of previous ones first. The Thief, written twenty years ago, won a Newbury Honor so it's listed as a children's book. Before passing this up, remember Wrinkle in Time and C.S. Lewis' Narnia are also found in the children't section. Some of the best books are.

The king's magus believes he knows where an ancient treasure is hidden. Needing a thief to assist him, he chooses Gen from prison. The story is still as good as the first time I read it. Megan based her world on ancient Greece as countries are rising from city-states but freely adds and alters to create her own setting. She is a master of clever surprises.

Warning: The second book, The Queen of Attolia, opens with a devastatingly violent scene. Still worthwhile.

Enjoy the day, Ann

38 comments:

  1. Oh I hate ripping out too..but if you will be happier at the end--it's worth it...hugs, Julierose

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    1. It will be worth it. Thanks, Julierose

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  2. Atta girl for doing the ripping! Getting it quilted as it is would accentuate the lumps/bumps. This top is worth the extra effort to make it flat. Liz in Houston

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  3. I am sorry to read you are having to backtrack and rip out, but if you are not happy then it's better to rip. I am sure the person who will be quilting this will appreciate the flat seams!

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    1. This is a change to normal MO. I usually just push through. I'm going to be happier when it's done. Thanks for writing, Patty.

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  4. Beautiful quilt, but I wanted to comment on your reading. I LOVE this series, and it's always a treat to see the comments of another fan. Thanks for reminding me about Whalen Turner's kingdom. I think I will do another re-read!

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    1. I'm delighted someone else knows this author and series. Rereading it has been worthwhile to me and I hope it will be enjoyable for you, too, Juliana.

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  5. this is worth all the unpicking. Now how will you overcome the lumps?

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    1. When I take these compass points out of the sashing there won't be any lumps. Or twists.

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  6. Are you familiar with the young adult fiction series about Termeraire by Naomi Novik? The first of nine is "His Majesty's Dragon". The audio version is outstanding.

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    1. Yes. I've read those. Naomi was an historian who started writing Temeraire. A friend who is an editor recommended it to me and I found the way she mixed fantasy with history very interesting. Hopefully others will read your comment and look her up.

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  7. What a shame you couldn't get the compasses to sit nicely. Still, you are wise to acknowledge defeat and back up; I'm sure you'll be happier with the end result for all the tedious seam-ripping. I have nothing against reading children's fiction but don't know these books. I'll investigate.

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    1. I'm disappointed that my original idea isn't working out but am pleased I didn't just force it through. (My usual MO.} I'd love to hear what you think of these books if you read them. I really enjoy books that use different cultures and eras as their settings.

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  8. I hate ripping too. But I really hate to be unhappy so would choose to rip too. I actually liked it before the compasses in the sashing and thought something nice quilted in the white space would make those Shadow Stars shine.

    I'm still stuck reading lots of WWII historical fiction on my kindle in the middle of the night when I can't sleep but occasionally I pick up an actual book of short stories and read from it. I used to read to grandkids from it and then we would discuss what was read. The Book of Virtues by William J Bennett.

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    1. I hope my quilter will have an idea for that space. Personally I never quilt those designs although I love to see them.
      I read several WWI and WWII books including Charles Todd and Jacqueline Winspear. Who have you read?
      The Book of Virtues sounds like something i should get for my grandchildren. Thanks.

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  9. Hmmm, so sorry to hear you need to rip out the sashing. Never a pleasant prospect!! but I've done the same: you know what you can live with and what you can't!! :-) And thank you for the referral for the book. I'm always looking for a good book, and find that in the youth section there are some that are just great! A good story without the gratuitous sex! Have you read the Inkheart series? I've found that series of books is very well written: I'd say it's my favorite series (only 3 books). Good luck on the quilt!! Hugs, H

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    1. It isn't pleasant but it's part of quilting, isn't it?
      Some of the best authors write in the teen and children's section. I read the Inkheart series a few years ago. It's wonderful and about time to reread.

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  10. Another thought: for the sashing and posts. What if you did a dark for the corner stone, then graduation out (with the dark, medium and light colors like you did with the colors "behind" the star points)with the medium and light in squares as big as the corner stones? It wouldn't leave you with lots of bulk in the seams the way the sashing stars have. Just a thought. Hugs, H

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    1. That's an idea but it may have the same spacing problems with seams unless I make the sashing much wider. It's something to keep in mind for another time, though. Thanks, Helen.

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  11. Seam ripping to remove a problem may seem frustrating on the surface, but I find it enormously empowering because I've made a decision to change directions (hopefully and almost always for the better). Good for you.

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    1. What a good point, Julie. I hope it will improve the top. Thanks for the support.

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  12. Yep, yep. Ripping out is incredibly annoying, but sometimes is the only solution if we are ever to properly FINISH the thing!:) Fingers crossed you can get this figured out. It really does look wonderful!

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    1. Annoying but part of the reality of quilting. We are the ones who should be happy when it's done. Thanks for the affimrations, Audrey.

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  13. I totally relate but wonder if you tried hammering the centers ala Jean Impey or using a tailor’s clapper. I’ve been amazed by those results.

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    1. I hadn't thought of those tricks. I wish I'd tried them before taking the sashing out.

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  14. I think you've made the best choice here Ann. Those blocks are beautiful and there's nothing worse than ending up with something you are not happy with. It will b e interesting to see how this is quilted.

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    1. Thanks, Maureen. Yes, we makers need to be satisfied with our work, don't we?

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  15. Appreciate your book comments, this sounds like another I need to follow up on.

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  16. The centers are darn complicated for me but ooh the fading effect - that is absolutely perfect. It gives me goosebumps!!!

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    1. That fading effect always intrigued me as a child. I'm glad to finally be making my own version.

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  17. Oh, such frustration. The blocks are so beautiful that they are worth the ripping. I think. (Time to break out that backup seam ripper that's nice and sharp!)

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    1. It's going better than I thought, Nann. The trick may be sewing them back together immediately.

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  18. Oh, thank you for the heads up on the newest from Megan Whalen Turner! I love those books. And I hope you can fix these blocks. They are lovely.

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    1. I'm glad to meet someone else who loved this series. I hadn't realized she'd written a fifth book in 2017. The sixth will be published this fall and I'll be ready with them all recently re-read.

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  19. I'm guessing by now you have almost finished all that unpicking? I'm sure you will be much happier, your blocks are brilliant! And yes, as I was reading this, I thought your quilter will love you for correcting those bits, and she'll love having more area to add her magic touch!

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    1. Yes, it's all unpicked. What a kind thought you sent, Linda. My quilter will probably be much happier. Haha.

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