Tuesday, May 24, 2016

May 2016 AHIQ Linkup - Utility and Improvisational Quilts

Not much quilting here but I attended Blanket Statements at San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles recently. Kaffe Fassett juxtaposed antique quilts from the Quilt Museum (now closed) in York, England, with a contemporary rendition from his studio. A contemporary example appears in the background of this post. The colors are much brighter but the historic roots are readily apparent.

Below is a detail of the antique scrap Wheel quilt, maker unknown. The outer side of the wheel is curved but the inner side is straight. There were usually two congruent wedges in each wheel but the layout alternates light and dark.
Wheel quilt detail at San Jose Quilt and Textile Museum exhibit.
From Quilters' Guild Collection, York, England. Maker unknown.
Now look carefully at the purple-circles-on-white fabric in the photo to the right. The quilt has been mended! And the mender didn't want to sew those curves. S(he) simply made straight-edged templates for the damaged sections. The careful mending with good but used fabric indicates to me that s(he) was capable of sewing the curves but chose not to do so. I wonder if the maker's daughter made these repairs. What happy memories she relived while mending this quilt for more year of use by the family.

EDIT: I found a photo of the entire Wheels quilt on the Quilters Guild Connection (UK) website.

I hope you either had a chance for some quilting or a good time with your family.

Enjoy the day, Ann


10 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It is, Julie. I'm pretty sure it was made from true scraps.

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  2. You are so observant Ann. My eyes only registered that the mended wheel did not look as round. It's a fun design with the inner parts forming an octagon and the outside parts a circle.
    Still no improv quilting (or any quilting!) going on here this month. It's driving me bonkers!

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    1. I visited twice before I saw these details. Like you, first I noticed some wheels weren't as round. I'm pretty sure the fabric underneath had started disintegrating. The mender had good skills but somehow chose not to keep the curve. Probably needed the quilt for warmth and this way was faster.

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  3. Thanks for the peep at the vintage quilt: it's beautiful and the mend just adds a little bit of extra character.

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    1. It is beautiful with lots of character. I keep thinking these were dressmaking scraps.

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  4. Thanks for showing the details of that wonderful quilt. It was probably my favorite in the show. Hadn't noticed the mended pieces. Gives the quilt more character.

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    1. I'd love to show the entire quilt. Like you, it was my favorite. I had to look for a while before I found the mending.

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  5. Wouldn't it be so good to know the full story of this quilt. I have two books from the Quilters' Guild, one covers he history of and photographs of old quilts, the other modern quilts inspired by older ones in the Collection.

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    1. Lucky you, Maureen. I'd enjoy those books. And I wish we had more details of these quilts, too.
      I wish I could post a photo of the entire quilt but can't because it's published.

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