Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Scale Change and an Ohio Star Quilt: AHIQ 30

Reading Kaja's prompt reminded me of a scrap quilt I made years ago. The small shoofly and star squares were from a block exchange. Because we traded two blocks at once, most of the resulting quilts were very similar - an alternate set like the center of mine.

I didn't have many blocks, didn't want to make more but also wanted a queen-size quilt. As everyone knows I've always loved interesting borders. Setting the small blocks in a really large star was my solution. The navy points were too severely dark so I exchanged part of one point for a striking Japanese-style print. {I put the extra dark navy on the back of this quilt so historians would know this was a design choice rather than a lack of fabric. Just amusing myself.} I also wanted to extend the star to its points but, fortunately for me, it became too large. Chopping them off makes a much stronger design.

Shoofly Star quilt set in a large star

It still didn't look right. I recall folding and overlaying various fabrics thinking I'd change more points out when ribbons came to mind. Now this is where I ran out of fabric. There are several different reds. Then gold because a second ribbon of red didn't look right. And somehow I decided to play with transparency where the ribbons passed over darker and lighter sections and crossed each other.

Border of Shoofly Star quilt plays with transparency

This has always been one of my favorite quilts. I gave it to QS for Christmas that year {198? mumble} and sleep under it when visiting. It's a special treat to have quilts scattered across the country. I feel like a grandmother: I get special time with them but don't have to care for them. Audrey made good points about sharing quilts with others in a recent post. Funnily enough, QS didn't quilt back then but this gift inspired her to start. See; I still make my sisters do things. Ha. Tag! You're it, Sis!

Quilt Details
Size: about 90" square (?), fits a queen-size bed
Design: Shoofly and Ohio Star blocks, original border of enlarged Star
Batting: Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon 100% cotton
Thread: cotton, gold metallic, and YLI nylon monofilament
Quilting: Walking foot, free-motion

Enjoy the day, Ann

An InLinkz Link-up

Linked to Finish it up Friday.

32 comments:

  1. It's a really intriguing quilt Ann ! I enjoyed reading about your making process and design choices. Love that you left a clue for historians ! :-))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Sophie. Thinking about the clue still makes me laugh 30 years later.

      Delete
  2. Very cool quilt and I like how you played with the transparent aspect of the bands. I sometimes think about how my quilts have ended up all over the world. It is humbling, yet powerful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your quilts do go to the most amazing places. And no wonder. They are original, sophisticated, and useable. Keep it up, Patty.

      Delete
  3. What a neat idea. I love it. And I may use it!

    A lot of my quilts go to people I will never see or meet. It's fun to glimpse photos of the quilts on the recipients every once in awhile. The latest photo was of a quilt I quilted and bound on a burn victim in Bangladesh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are such a generous quilter, Cathy. It is satisfying to catch peeks of our quilts in use. It always makes my heart sing.

      Delete
  4. Ann, this is an amazing quilt! Love walking through your thought process with you. I’m not surprised that upon receipt, QS was quick to become a Quilter like Sister. I, too, love to sleep under the quilts I’ve gifted when visiting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Karen. I always enjoy reading about other quilters' processes. Isn't it a treat to share with others - both the process with other makers, and the resulting quilts with family and friends?

      Delete
  5. What a clever border. It adds so much to this quilt. I'm learning so much from you and Kaja. Thanks for pointing out the exchange of fabrics for one of the star points. That really made a difference, I think. It is a visually appealing quilt and then there's more. I love studying the fabrics that are chosen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The border makes the quilt. I found out quite early in block exchanges that two-block exchanges usually lead to very similar quilts. Hence the border effort.
      I'd forgotten how much I like this very strong, visual quilt; the dark blue fabric makes it for me.

      Delete
  6. Wow - that is a gorgeous quilt. Scrappy and everything. No wonder it inspired your sister to start quilting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Julie. It's certainly a delight to share quilting with a sister.

      Delete
  7. Oh, it's wonderful! I certainly understand why it's one of your favorites.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Nann. Isn't it a joy when we still like a quilt so many years later? And we all have a few favorites.

      Delete
  8. There's so much to love about this quilt! The fact that you chopped off the tips of your big Sawtooth star makes it so much more impactful for sure. LOVE, love the transparency look in the border edges of your quilt. Really fun to see this today. I don't often play with things like transparency, but this makes me want to try again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How kind of you to confirm so many of the choices, Audrey. Funny how you inspire me to try applique in the same way this inspires you to try transparency again. I so enjoy seeing how we each get excited about aspects of other quilts and then find ways to incorporate those ideas in our own work.

      Delete
  9. Terrific quilt! The large blue with the stripes is really super.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Paula. That navy was such a quiet print; I think that's what made the stripes work so well on it.

      Delete
  10. Wow - I love your quilt, just perfect for this scale challenge!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Maureen. I'd forgotten this quilt but it's a great example of Kaja's scale challenge and it will be a while before I start anything myself.

      Delete
  11. I absolutely love this one, Ann. The mix of the very precise piecing with the freer, less expected elements works perfectly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kaja. After you presented your challenge I remembered this quilt. It had such a graphic character but also fit your idea very well. I thought it would segue to what I'm doing now... except I haven't time to quilt for a while. At least I'm participating a bit.

      Delete
  12. Just for fun try doing a search on "sawtooth star vs. ohio star". Your quilt is beautiful and creative, but I believe that it is a sawtooth or variable star. No offense intended.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure you're correct. I'm very distracted this month and it's been years since I made this quilt. Thanks.

      Delete
  13. Great design and you get to see it when visiting QS, who was won over by that quilt's influence.
    I like that inspiring story. Thanks for hosting AHIQ with Kaja.
    This is why it's good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am always intrigued by Kaja's work and was delighted to host AHIQ with her. We have very different styles. In fact, each participant has a unique voice. Seeing each person's work and reading their explanations are the best aspect of our linkups. I'm so glad you agree, Janie. Thanks!

      Delete
  14. Hi Ann,
    WOW! What a gorgeous quilt, and what a labor of love. The center itself is spectacular but the border - can it be called a border when it is a pattern itself?! I am speechless and cannot express myself well enough to say how beautiful this is. Your sister is a very lucky gal getting to enjoy this in her house. You must love her very much! ~smile~ Roseanne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely comment. It's one of my favorite borders. I often think this would be an idea to reprise. Thanks, Roseanne.

      Delete
  15. OMG!!! I'm in LOVE with your quilt!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The stripes through the star points, the chopped off points (on purpose!), and the "ribbons" in the borders are all very interesting techniques. In case you need another sister to give this quilt to, I'm your girl. :o))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for writing. It was always one of my favorite borders and came about in stages as I worked through the design.

      Delete

I enjoy reading your comments and usually reply here where everyone can read and join in. We have some great conversations.