Saturday, June 16, 2018

Contemporary Craft: Weaving

Rooted, Revived, Reinvented is the current exhibit at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. I finally had time to view it. The first area highlighted  historic and indigenous examples such as this 19th c. Treasure basket, possibly Yokuts. They were a tribe in the San Joaquin valley and Sierra Nevada foothills - near my favorite parts of California.

1890 Feather basket, possibly Yokuts

Most of the exhibit concentrated on reinvented basketry. I was taken by these small Mixing Bowls by Karryl Sisson (2003) which were coiled with polymer and vintage cloth tape measures. I'd like some in my sewing room.

Mixing Bowls by Karryl Sisson (2003)

Then this amazing basket recalled the Feather one above. The sharp porcupine quills in the top are reprised with black ash and pine needles in the jar.

Porcupine by Joanne Russo, 1999.

From a distance this menagerie appeared to be cut from iron sheeting.

According to Isidore by Carol Eckert, 2015

But closer inspection reveals the scene is entirely composed of coiled linen and wire.


Detail of According to Isidore by Carol Eckert, 2015


At the end a display of "Touch Me" basketry techniques and materials encouraged comparing the tactile impression of various techniques such as weaving, plaiting, coiling, stapling, netting, twining and lashing. How would these translate in quilting?

Basketmaking techniques on display
I hope your weekend is as much fun.

Enjoy the day, Ann

14 comments:

  1. What an interesting exhibit!

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    1. These new basketmakers are so inventive and use beautiful materials.

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  2. All are wonderful; hard to pick a favorite. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The exhibit was much larger but I was struck by their creativity. Thanks for writing.

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  3. Amazing works you saw--just how creative are we humans ;))) thanks for sharing, Ann hugs, Julierose

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    1. You're right, Julie Rose. We are creative creatures. Seeing work others are doing was exciting; I'm still processing the impressions.

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  4. Replies
    1. It was, Julie. I never considered merging basketry and sculpture. Rather like Susan Else's work that combines quilting and dollmaking.

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  5. These are all amazing/ the vintage cloth tape measures ...love!:)

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    1. Aren't they the best? I think all quilters would want some tape measures bowls.

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  6. Fun and gorgeous pieces.
    The baskets are fascinating in texture and pattern.
    Weaving is how cloth is made too.

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    1. You're right, Janie. They are a step or two closer to origin than us quilters.

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  7. Isn't it amazing the things people can think of?

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    1. I was very impressed with the quality and diversity of these baskets. I'd never have considered making sculpture with them.

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