Saturday, September 15, 2018

Chinese Coins XI Top

What a fun day! Deep thinking about different prints and how to arrange them to tell the maker's story. I forgot to take photos though but hope to get some as the quilts are finished. That's an advantage of working with your own guild. :-)

This top was sewed just in time for the class. I guess I haven't changed that much: still working to the deadline.

Chinese Coins XI quilt top
Since a collage worked so well last time, I made another with the original grouping next to the finished top. They are both diffuse, fairly random arrangements but the final one works better - a soft sorting in quiet {for me} colors. The original pinup had most corals at the top. Additionally, one fabric group was missing which added several columns to the quilt. 

By pinning smaller "sheets" together I retain the ability to easily move, rotate, remove, and add Coins until it's finished. You can see many changes between the two photos which should give you some idea of the versatility of this method.

Comparing Chinese Coins XI top finished and in progress

Fabrics cut up quite differently than they look as yardage, especially large scale prints. Just like a good haircut frames your face, they look so polished and confident when they are cut to display to advantage.

It's a simple, happy quilt. It cleared out some of my scraps. And it made one more example of fabric sorting for the class. Win. Win. Win.

Enjoy the day, Ann

28 comments:

  1. i agree--I keep (hoard!) my uglies as when they are cut up [I learned from making a scrap vomit..uh..vortex quilt] they really work differently...I really like the colors in this quilt --can it be # 11?? Your coin bank must be almost empty lol. Anyway, it is lovely...hugs, Julierose

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    1. We think alike, Julie Rose. These fabrics would work in a vortex, too. Plus the method is good practice for creating more interesting blocks.

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  2. Hooray for a good day! And I love the analogy of a good haircut - SO true!!

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    1. Thanks, Julie.
      We think alike on polishing what we have - fabrics or haircuts.

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  3. I think this is my fav so far - but I say that everytime you post a new one! These are my colors-like a box of crayons. Would have loved to have been in your class. I love coin quilts and yours have inspired me to start another!

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    1. I'm glad you like it, Cindy. It reminds me of a low volume quilt - at least as low volume as I'll make. I wish you'd been there, too.

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  4. I like this very much. The colors are all bright tones, but the dark and light really gives it bones. I now know what tone I want to make with your method. It will be so different but using your methods I think. I'm inspired. (Now to really do it)

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    1. All those mediums have similar values. It would disappear without the black and white, wouldn't it? I'll expect a fabulous quilt once your studio is set up. Fun! Thanks for cheering me on, LeeAnna.

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  5. Such a cheerful chinese coins variation!! So many beautiful colors that play so beautifully with each other. Can't wait to hear how the demo went!!

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    1. And I want more details about your last workshop. You are one busy woman. Go!

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  6. I am really enjoying seeing all of your chinese coin quilts. So inspiring.

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    1. Thanks, Pamela. I want to see what you create. Always fun to figure out why we make the choices we do.

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  7. Really do love all of your coin quilts. I have been thinking of making a similar one for myself. I have a whole bunch of scraps I need to use.

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    1. It's a good way to use the scraps since you can concentrate on the fabrics. Plus I like the organization the columns add.

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  8. Lovely, I'm glad your class went well.
    Helping Quilter's use color to advantage is always a popular topic!

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    1. Thanks, Janie. Helping others made me very happy.

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  9. I love this! I'm thinking about all my "small pieces" of fabric and doing one of these.

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    1. I hope you do, Pamela. I like the randomness of the fabric with the structure of the columns.

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  10. Another very good looking Coins quilt top.

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    1. Thanks, Patty. Good to empty the scrap bag.

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  11. Oops, I read this post, thought my response but completely failed to type it! This may be scraps but it is very coherent; I am thinking your sorting of colour sets at the beginning may have a lot to do with this. I'm so enjoying all the iterations of the basic Coin idea and am learning a lot from following what you do.

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    1. I assume we can use the Vulcan Mind Meld sometimes, too. And then have to write it later.
      These scraps are almost too coherent but they worked out. I'm ready to try some other designs soon. I just kept thinking I needed more examples. One of the many ways I drive myself crazy. I'm glad you're enjoying them. I like watching your quilts come together. There are so many pieces of different sizes that make a beautiful, unified whole. I want to try that myself.

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  12. Wow -- subtle changes but they make a big difference. Thanks for sharing the process of your coinage. (After all of these you can call your sewing studio The Mint. )

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    1. Moving these scraps around makes a huge difference. The results always amaze me. I’m glad you found it interesting, too.
      The Mint. You’re so clever with words, Nann.

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  13. Love this one Ann, the mix of different sized strips make for a fantastic Chinese Coins.

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    1. Thanks, Maureen. I do like using all the bits.

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