Tuesday, October 9, 2018

A Border Ready and Waiting

I'm still working on the HSTs and came up with a great plan while putting the extra HSTs away. In the box were the Cultural Fusion Crossroads blocks that have been waiting over a year.

A dark block anchors each corner while the remaining Crossroads blocks were added in two possible values. They both look good to me. The one on the right needs a very strong border while the one on the left needs something else. The blocks won't fit together without some type of border or adjustment.

Dark and light borders around HST center

Compare the photos above with the one below which was an early version of Chinese Coins II. Even though the stars are about the same size as the triangles and the coins in CCII are narrower than those in HST, my Crossroads blocks changed appearance like a chameleon. They are spindly and fragile below but perfect with the HSTs. Like they were planned for this design. Why this works is something I need to study more.


Chinese Coins II quilt with possible Crossroads block border

In other news, Color Study's binding is on. It should be a finish soon.

Binding strips cut, then sewing to back first
A group of us visited the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles recently. Their exhibits included fifteen or more swing coats by Patricia Montgomery celebrating important women of the Civil Rights Movement.

Honoring the Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement: Patricia A Montgomery
exhibit at The San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles

Construction is highlighted by the unfinished coat on the wall. The textiles and colors of each coat vary. They are embellished with quotes and photos celebrating each heroines importance. In a time when Helen Keller has been removed from Texas social studies textbooks, it's even more important to remember that women can effect change as much as men.

Strong People Don't Need Strong Leaders - Ella Josephine Baker

This yellow coat highlights Ella Baker who advanced group-centered (grass-roots) leadership where people "directly directly participate in the decisions that effect their lives." One advantage is that the movement becomes important rather than a single charismatic leader. This idea led to longer-lived, independent organizations such as the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Enjoy the day, Ann

30 comments:

  1. My eyes are drawn to the first photo on the left, I guess for the color balance and how the crossroads blocks compliment the Hst's. I'm always fascinated at how you are able to combine an amazing variety of scraps into a coherent and beautiful whole.

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    1. Those crossroads blocks work so well this time. I like the darker one, too. But also love that turquoise blue.

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  2. I really like the lighter bordered ones on the right--love those Cultural fusion blocks--they look amazing with the HST's...they bring out the stripes in those HST's really well...lovely piece hugs, Julierose

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    1. I feel so lucky that the crossroads blocks work so well this time. It's been fun using all these scraps and bits.

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  3. Thank you for posting about the museum exhibit - how very interesting! Your quilts are very colorful and fun to look at.

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    1. I like reading about your trips, too. I hope to visit Japan some day.

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  4. I think it works because the stars mimic the crossroads at a very simplistic level and pull the colors in from the crossroads--more balance in the distribution of color. I love the hst's but the solid colors overwhelm the crossroads. Love that you share these steps so we can see the thought behind the quilts--encouragement to try alternatives when we aren't in love with the first layout.

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    1. You make many good points, Linda. Thanks. I like reading abiut process more than final result. I think all us makers do.

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  5. there is a lot of movement here, and I'll be interested to see how a dark inner border settles the action a bit. I could see a tone on tone navy or black in there... very cool star sashing. I'd like to use something like that. Always interesting over here, seeing the possibilities! coats are just terrific, thanks for sharing those.

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    1. Thanks, LeeAnna. I'm thinking about various borders but hadn't thought of navy. Good idea.

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  6. So much excitement in your blocks. The dark corners are a great idea. I don't have a preference for dark or light borders. They both work but convey a different mood. Guess, it is all up to you. How do you feel, Ann? Going to the dark side...a reflection of our times.

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    1. How kind of you, Preeti. The border colors change the quilt more than I expected and, as you said, they vary the mood.

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  7. Perfect addition of the Crossroads blocks, I love both the light and the dark!

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    1. Thanks, Maureen. I like both of these colors, too, and am glad the crossroads blocks work so well here.

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  8. Wow--those border blocks are a fabulous addition. Amazing how the HSTs look totally different depending on which color set of blocks you use in the border!!

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    1. Thanks, Mel. Seeing the changes from simply changing the colors of the border was unexpected.

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  9. I enjoyed reading your post, so interesting to see both versions with the 'crossroads' blocks. Decision making is an exciting part of the process, and it's keeping it real for all of us. Look forward to seeing which way to pick to go with this.

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    1. Process and decision making are my favorite parts of quilting blogs, too, Linda. I think all makers want to understand why others chose their paths. Thanks for writing.

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  10. What a cool exhibit that would have been! Like what you are doing with your current project.

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    1. It was eye opening, Julie. Educational from a sewing context and even more so from an historical perspective. There is so much to learn from others. Thanks for writing.

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  11. Lots of design possibilities, looking good.
    And that's an interesting display at the museum.
    Taking time to get involved and understanding different
    viewpoints is a good thing. Sometimes hate and violence
    are thought of as being activist. But when people give themselves over
    to that way of thinking they show their ignorance. Hate and anger has
    always been and always will be destructive.
    Martin Luther King understood the concept of brotherhood and peace.

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    1. It was very educational to read about the many ways people brought Civil Rights to the forefront of our consciences. I agree with you. Listening to other points of view helps us create situations where everyone can benefit.

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  12. So much fun to see both possibilities! I am really drooling over the feel of the first one, but the second one is wonderful too. Always a pleasure to see how you work with color and design! Once again, this is so very 'you'.:)

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    1. Thanks, Audrey. It's driving me a bit crazy since I like both borders for different reasons. The one on the left has more presence but the blues on the right simply look beautiful. It's been helpful to work more slowly. Plus lots of other calls on my time these days.

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  13. What a shame you haven't got enough HSTs to make both variations; they would make a great pair. I too like both and am going to spend the rest of the day pondering why they work so differently here from with your Chinese Coins.

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    1. You know, I think there are enough HSTs. I'm not sure if there are enough Crossroads. Making both is a good idea but I'm selfish enough to want one of these as a keeper.
      I've been pondering the differences between the HSTs and Chinese Coins and currently think the CCs come across as large rectangles floating behind wide sashing while the HSTs look smaller - more the size of the Crossroads. It may be because of the uniform colors and values in the CCs. The strips in the HSTs are certainly wider than the CCs. Anyway, an interesting treatment of wide and narrow strips within larger and smaller blocks.

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  14. Is your head spinning yet? Such beautiful work. You really put your all into it. I’m looking forward to seeing where it goes from here. MY head is spinning....I’m stuck on that statement about Tx taking Helen Keller, etc., out of the history books......saw that on the news the other night and I’m still shaking my head, trying to wrap my brain around the reasoning.

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    1. Thanks for writing, Karen. I'm always amazed at Texas education. Of course, many people (including me) take a laissez-faire attitude which leaves room for people with agendas to get their way. Most of the people they cut were women but they left Moses and Billy Graham. In public education. Go figure.

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  15. I love how you take a theme or motif and carry it from one work to another. And execute it so beautifully. Just tiny changes are all you need for a new quilt, but then there are the similarities. So much to think about and figure out.
    The exhibit looks especially interesting. I'm sure you realized that this exhibit follows some of those same principles of carrying ideas over from work to work, yet allowing each piece to become something different at the same time. One coat pattern yet many different coats teaching about many different people who all fought for the same ideals.

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    1. I can tell you've taught for years, Mary. I have enjoyed these iterations and haven't considered it as a design idea until recently.
      Yes, those coats - all in the same basic design -create a great canvas for her art.

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