Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Lone Star Quilt Top

The Lone Star top went together without any trouble. The effect of the fussy cut diamonds in the center is striking to me and the medium blue brightens up the otherwise dour fabrics. Those dots make me happy, too.

Once again I considered adding appliqué in the corners but that would call for another medium blue and there's none in the stash. Plus, SIL would probably like feathers. Markings will show up easily on the white but so will mistakes.

Blue Lone Star quilt top 3

This traditional design runs in my family. My parents had a large version on their bed made by my grandmother. It was already a generation old when they got it and finally disintegrated when my kids were young. By using all our quilts daily, my mother sparked my lifelong interest in quilting. {Now I know who to blame.} So much better than storing it in a cupboard and never learning to appreciate handmade items.

In the late 80s, Catherine Anthony offered her final eight-week Master Quiltmaking class which I was clever enough to join. She and her daughter, Libby Lehman, wrote a set of books detailing six-inch blocks. Of course, I purchased the oversized books {but later passed them on during a move. It's hard to transport big paperbacks.} Catherine was a treasure-house of details about math calculations and  precision sewing. Towards the end, we covered Lone Stars and I made a pillow which is long lost. No photos either but that traditional design was my first Lone Star.

In 2006 I took a class with Jan Krentz and made my second Lone Star for a friend. Her book Lone Star Quilts and Beyond is still available. It was in my library until recently.

The cotton sateen border print had been in my stash for a while. Most was used making a dust ruffle and trimming the curtains but it was so lovely I couldn't discard any.

Lone Star quilt 2

Here's a detail. Choosing fabrics was pretty easy - just match or tone with the border. Most are batiks or tone-on-tone prints. As you can tell, I don't worry about mixing different types of fabric.

Detail of Lone Star quilt 2
The border print reminds me of happy times creating our first home. Very fond memories.

Enjoy the day, Ann

24 comments:

  1. Your Lone Star is amazing--just beautiful I really like your colors...hugs, Julierose

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    1. Thanks, Julie Rose. My SIL will like it and it will be a surprise since she only knows about the lap quilt.

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  2. The top turned out very pretty! I have never made a lone star quilt. I do have two lone star quilts my grandmother made - one for my Dad and his brother when they were young. They are made with 40's solid colors - those dirty looking colors. Even though Grandma was a very good seamstress, she didn't like quilting and these are the only two she ever made. It is funny looking at them because she got tired of the hand quilting so she finished them with machine quilting them on an electrified treadle machine.

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    1. I had a quilt that started with hand quilting and ended by machine. Just happy to get it done.
      She was a trooper to make two.

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  3. lone star quilts are tricky with all the bias but yours looks like a kaleidoscope of colored glass!

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    1. The trick is to starch the fabric well. Jan and Paula Nadelstern were the first quilters I knew who made Kaleidoscope quilts. If you're interested, both their books are excellent.

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  4. Beautiful quilts all! I especially love the fussy cutting and your use of a border print. It takes a while as a quilter to see the options available with different fabrics. I know I look at fabric an entirely different way with EPP than I did with applique. So many options, so little time! Thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. They remind me how much more can be done with prints. We too often stop too early in our discoveries.

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  5. The colorful Lone Star is just magnificent!! Both the colors and the prints make me think of an silk sari! Thanks for sharing and inspiring!!

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    1. An explosion of color, for sure. I like your image. Thanks.

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  6. I love what you did with the center of Lone Star 3, great focus point.
    That pattern runs in your family, super classic!

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    1. It's amazing how inspired we be one as a fabric runs out.
      Knowing my grandmother made this pattern makes it more accessible in an odd way. Or historic?

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  7. I really like the way the blue star has turned out - those dots give a modern feel to the traditional design - and I like the idea of feathers on the white too. I like to see both versions together; it shows how much the fabric choices can vary the look of the design - both are striking, but so, so different.

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    1. I found the progression through the years interesting. My grandmother’s was certainly in the 20-30s style. The 2nd is all 90s in-your-face glitz, and this latest is mostly a reproduction with current touches from the fussy cutting and placement. As you note, the layout seems more constant than Coins but the fabrics change them a lot.

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  8. Your blue and white Lone Star is a beauty, it reminds me of a flower opening! Good luck with the quilt marking, feathers sound good. Lone Star 2 is so very different, full of many colours, lovely. Having a border fabric which is special and using the colour for the diamonds is such a good way to find a balance, I've done this before once or twice and been very pleased with the result.

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    1. Using a focus fabric always seems a bit like cheating to me but the results are striking. I can imagine how beautifully yours turned out with your eye for fabulous fabrics, Maureen.

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  9. Your blue Lone Star just makes me sigh. Love it! Such a great combination of fabrics and colors and of course it looks like it went together easy peasy for you. Diamonds are not my friend, tho I have actually tried to improve my rusty skills a time or two just because I love the design so much! Thanks for sharing both of them. Very inspiring.:)

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    1. How kind of you, Audrey. The blue and white reminds me that restrained can be lovely and I think the fussy cut center updates a classic look quite well. SIL will love it.
      I don’t have much trouble with diamonds although I certainly use a lot of starch!

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