Saturday, February 6, 2016

Rhythmic Grid Begins and AHIQ Wrap Up

Another great AHIQ link up. Kaja and I are delighted with the response. The projects cover a broad range of improvisation highlighting its diversity. Several people told us how happy they are to have a place to share their interest. We can tell: viewers click the links and leave insightful comments on many blogs. Conversations begin; others join in. Thank you so much for making this linkup a success. We look forward to our next one, February 22. What will you have to share?

This month's score in my study group was Rhythmic Grid. From the moment I saw it on the cover of Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters, Sherri's bold boxes in strong, clear blues and apple reds had me chomping at the bit to try it myself. However, the month got away from me. Okay, grandbaby cuddling took precedence but {I thought} I had a plan. Turns out I had a lot to learn.

The peachy-cream polished cotton came from the Britex sale room. It was supposed to be the border of my selvedge string quilt. The leaves looked good against the fabric but it did not work with the top. Not awful; just like they were two different tops.

Selvedge leaves as a possible border
The polished cotton should have gone into a box. Instead, it only made it as far as the to-be-filed pile where it caught my eye daily. When MK sent a reminder of the meeting, I knew I had to get busy. Starting here I pulled five other fabrics that {seemed to} go together but also had a definite color shift for the permeable border of rhythmic grid. And immediately forgot to take a photo.

The inner sashings were pink/green/tan stripe and brown with coral polka dots. When laid out, the brown had too much contrast. The stripe turned out to be a fat quarter and was almost gone.

Original row for Rhythmic Grid
Next I pulled a coral red batik and a large floral Alexander Henry. After unsewing one brown side, I set the others aside. That turned out to be a wise decision.

Adding the sixth row to Rhythmic Grid
As the quilt progressed, it needed some darker areas. Back came the original sections, reworked into diagonals. By the sixth row, only some floral and a bit of the cream solid remained.

Surprises:
  1. Not checking fabric amounts carefully before beginning.
  2. Quilt size affects the color values. The brown was too strong for a small section but perfect as the quilt increased in size.
Discoveries:
  1. Construction worked best for me when I cut the sashing strips first and then filled in the solid center. 
  2. Wait until the two-, three-, and four-sided units are sewn before determining the width of filler units, those with no colored strips on any side. All those seam allowances take more room than I planned. Good thing there was enough cream filler.
On to the borders!

Enjoy the day,

14 comments:

  1. Really like that idea of using the selvedges in the block way, endless opportunities for play there and of course the leaves are delightful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I do love the leaves, just not as the border of this quilt. They would be great in some other project though.

      Delete
  2. thanks a meeeelion for setting up that link party Ann. It is so much fun, and I've met some cool people visiting blogs. LeeAnna

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, LeeAnna. I'm so impressed with the quilters who've linked up. Such an insightful group with really thoughtful posts. It truly expands improvisation to read their blogs.

      Delete
  3. I am sorry I missed the link up this month, but I did visit a bunch of other blogs, too and it is great to see what people are posting. I'm also very interested in the insights people are recording about process...including yours above. I may start grabbing them as I see them and make a compilation at some point. Between AHIQ and the Improv Quilters on FB, we are developing a body of information! Your Rhythmic Grid is really striking. I understand what you mean about how the scale of the piece changes the impact of the colors and values, and you did need those darker bits after all. I also like the unexpected pops of color and shapes in the large-scale print. Of course "busier is better" is sort of my thing. Nice job, Ann!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I missed a post from you this month, too. Although I read your blog regularly. But the people who've posted on this linky are a very thoughtful group. Turns out there's a lot to say.
      I'm glad you concur with my thoughts on this top. Funny to realize how size changes things. I also can't believe this top has a total of 9 fabrics. I'd never have believed I could work with this few.

      Delete
  4. I love the movement in your Rhythmic Grid - especially with the original blocks added.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Maureen. I was amazed how wrong they looked in a small size and how equally wrong it looked without them as the quilt increased in size.

      Delete
  5. I agree with Maureen. Your quilt has a lot of rhythm and that dark fabric adds a lot to it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Shasta. It went together much differently than my original ideas.

      Delete
  6. Those leaf blocks are so fantastic!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Mel. I think I'll keep them in mind for a future quilt.

      Delete
  7. I love this one Ann. I think the really dark strips were a great idea, the way they move the eye across the surface is great. You're really romping through the book now aren't you?! I'm itching for new project but have been resisting because I've got a few to quilt up at the moment...you're not doing me any favours! Looking at your wonderful 'experiments' makes me feel resistance is useless!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Stephi. It means so much when an artist likes this. We are ready to finish up the book but not exactly racing. But we have formed a strong, thoughtful critique group. And I have several workshops coming up. Must get busy quilting... On the machine.

      Delete

I enjoy reading your comments and usually reply here where everyone can read and join in. We have some great conversations.