Saturday, November 12, 2016

T-Shirt Quilt Finished

This quilt is finally done and in the mail. Wow. It's taken longer than any other t-shirt quilt I've made. {Guess I'm out of practice.}

She wanted many t-shirts incorporated. They each represent an important memory. After choosing the twelve main blocks she then selected 20 pocket logos for posts. Did you notice the lower left block is actually two t-shirts sewn together?

University of Arkansas and Alpha Omega Pi t-shirts framed in light prints, sashed with red.
Megan t-shirt quilt
Text bites and images from  the remaining shirts and leftovers from shirts already used were scattered across the surface and machine appliqued with matching thread or invisible nylon. These are usually placed in bare areas of the larger blocks and extend into the sashing. Two of them are actual pockets cut so the pocket still works. With so many layers, both sewing and quilting must be slow and careful.

And look at the binding. It's an older 30's reproduction plaid on point that I loved but never used. I think it goes very well with both front and back. Who'd have thought? {I love mixing styles unexpectedly.}

Megan's t-shirt quilt, detail of binding, backing and free-motion quilting
 Quilting the border seemed daunting originally. How would I highlight the huge circles. I worried too much. It's a combination of spirals with echos to get to a new area. I used purple thread. The pink and blue threads were too severe on alternate colors. Purple blends pink and blue; perhaps that's why it worked here.




Border folded to half circle
We considered cutting the binding at half and three-quarters of the circles by the simple expedient of folding the border back.

Border folded to 3/4 of the circles
The half circles may be my favorite but overall, the border seems too narrow for the quilt. The partial circle is neither here nor there.

Quilt Details
Size: 77" x 96"
Batting: Mountain Mist Cream Rose 100% cotton
Thread: Various cotton, Metler neon polyester, YLI invisible nylon
Quilting: Walking foot and free motion on a domestic machine

Enjoy the day,
Ann

PS. Linked to Finish it Up Friday.

23 comments:

  1. I love how you put this quilt together, with the applique here and there around the blocks. It adds a lot of interest and allows you to use smaller bits. Love it!!

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    1. Thanks, Ariana. It is a good way to use more shirts. And the recipients usually have loads of them.

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    1. Thanks, Karen. I think she will like it.

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  3. I don't normally care much for T-shirt quilts but this one really caught my eye. What a fun memory quilt. That binding fabric is perfect. I have a difficult time mixing styles and usually keep even my 30s and civil war fabric scraps separate from all the rest of the scraps. I might have to break out of that box.

    Looks like an outstanding job to me!

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    1. I think most quilters have designs they prefer to t-short quilts but it is a pleasure to give such joy to friends. They always love these quilts that highlight their on memories.
      Mixing fabrics takes practice. I love doing it and think it's one of my talents. Doesn't always work. I was never interested in using one line of Fabrics either. It's too much fun to mix it up.

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  4. It's wonderful Ann! I think you're over-thinking the border, it works well - and the focus is the memories the t-shirts hold after all :) The way you made the logos cross into the border emphasises that I think. And yes, the binding you chose *is* just perfect, what serendipity!

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    1. Thanks, Stephie. My original thought was to cut this down but I like the whole border best. I was afraid the big circles might distract from the circles. Its good to investigate all choices.

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    2. I meant... The big circles might distract from the shirts.

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  5. Great finish, Ann. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the border! It works beautifully and is a pleasant surprise for a tee shirt quilt. I noticed the plaid binding but didn't realize that it's a 1930's fabric. Strange, because I have a small piece of fabric very like this one. You are really good at mixing things up a bit. These fabrics play beautifully!

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    1. What a lovely comment, Mary. New fabric and printed fabrics seem to dress up t-shirt quilts.
      There was a year they printed several plaids on point; I bought many but haven't used them. It's sometimes hard to remember they look quite different when cut. One of the benefits of a smaller stash is serendipitously dropping these oddities on a project.
      I want to see what you do.

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  6. What a great quilt! I love how you added smaller pieces across some of the blocks and sections of border. I think it really adds to the quilt. Great choice on the binding fabric. It looks perfect.

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    1. Thank you, Nancy. I also think it breaks up the design, makes it more random and spontaneous. Plus it adds a bit of "hide and seek" to the results.

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  7. I love the mix, the 'serendipity' of the quilt that's what makes it art instead of a being stuffy and contrived.

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  8. The quilt turned out wonderful! I liked the way you added the bits and pieces. I am sure it will be treasured!

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    1. Thank you, Patty. You make these types of quilts, too, so you know how beloved they are by the recipients.

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  9. I really like how you have used the logos to cut across the blocks or sashing: it stops things being too rigid and keeps the eye moving. I love the border with the circles and the binding fabric - once again you display that gift for mixing unexpected elements but balancing it all just right.

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    1. Thanks, Kaja. Those bits remind me of confetti the way they break up the blocks.

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  10. Wow, 96", I never realize how big they are! It turned out beautifully, and I love that 30s print binding. I love mixing genres like that too, especially when they look like they were from the same collection! Great finish, and it seems plenty quick to me. :D

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    1. These kinds of quilts can easily grow... like this one. It was only supposed to be a throw.

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  11. Wonderful! I love the binding, it's perfect! Was it tricky sewing with t-shirts?

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    1. T-shirts aren't too difficult once they are fused to interfacing. I use the lightest-weight, non-woven Pellon. There is a difference in the stretch of wovens and knits so I always use FMQ. The meander stitch helps keep the t-shirts from puckering (as it might if I'd used a walking foot.
      I also start and stop stitching rather than cross the printed design. Piercing that plasticy material causes it to shred more quickly.
      Are you planning to make one?

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  12. I found your blog when you linked to Cathy L's. I've enjoyed looking at all the t-shirt quilts you've made. I'm always on the lookout for interesting settings. I offer a t-shirt quilt as a silent auction item at our Rotary golf outing. I figure one a year is enough for me.

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I enjoy reading your comments and usually reply here where everyone can read and join in. We have some great conversations.