Saturday, August 25, 2018

Spending Coins and a Question

Wink at the Moon for Neil Armstrong tonight, the anniversary of his passing. The human race cooperated to advance science when man first walked on the moon. Respectfully working together lifted us all to new levels of achievement. Surely we can do it again to resolve issues closer to home.

Since there were still a bunch of Coins and Coin strips cluttering up my space I added them to my 20 minute projects. The first one simply needed two more columns sewn to the top. The other was all the leftover sheets - that's what I call the short sections of Coins.

While the dark colors were on the design wall I pinned these strips to see if sashing would work. I'm not thrilled with any of these, perhaps because the Coins are uniformly dark. Obviously I will add sashing to some future Coins quilt; I keep trying to put some in.

Dark Chinese Coin columns with possible sashing fabrics

Then I sewed the remaining yellow coins in two short sessions. There are almost enough columns for two more toddler quilts. On one hand I can't believe I cut so many coins; on the other hand this amount makes a bed-size quilt. Think about it: four or five toddler quilts (40x50") equals one queen quilt (90"x100".) It's like cooking after the boys leave home. Without those bottomless pits, food stays around forever. How many days of leftovers can you stand before you just toss them?

Chinese Coins IX needed some sashing strips to increase the width. At least I thought so. Placing funky green lozenge fabric between two blue columns makes an interesting variation. {You can't believe I purchased this fabric off the sale rack four years ago, can you?} Needing to cut vertically on a third of a yard, each sash was made of four pieces. After working hard to match the first one through the middle of the lozenge, I wised up and sewed across the relatively empty area between them. {Too soon old and too late smart.}

Chinese Coin IX quilt top

The second of these quilts ran short on fabric in two columns. I added some narrower sheet sets to lengthen them. To make those wide enough I pinned the last of the green lozenges along the sides. I like this one although it doesn't quite match my lesson plan.

Chinese Coin X quilt top

A Final Question
This yellow and blue English wax batik has been in my stash for 20+ years.

English Wax batik

I loved it when I bought it but have never used it. At one time I planned to cut it up for a kaleidoscope but that never happened. Should I use it on the back of these quilts? They are the closest I've come to blending with the batik. In fact, I wonder why I didn't include some Coins from it.

English wax batik (8" vertical repeat, 13" repeat across WOF)

At 45" wide and 96" long, it will easily make two backs but using this stunning fabric as the back of baby quilts seems wasteful.

Guaranteed English Wax, Veritable Wax Anglais

It could be a fabulous baby quilt back or borders or a fussy-cut kaleidoscope. What would you use it for?

Enjoy the day, Ann

30 comments:

  1. I would either fussy cut-- or have you read "The Fabric Makes the Quilt" by Roberta Horton? This piece reminds me of the fabrics she showcases in that book--which is one of my all time favorites. You might get an idea from it...I think to use it on the reverse of a baby quilt would be a waste--just sayin' ;))) hugs, Julierose

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    1. That's been the plan. I just need to get busy. I read Roberta's book long ago and should probably re-read it. Thanks for the nudge, Julierose .

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  2. I would not use it for the back of the baby quilts....such a waste of fabulous fabric! I would definitely try using it for borders...it would be amazing.....really that fabric deserves to be on the front :)

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    1. It does deserve a front spot, Cherie. I just need to get busy with it.

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  3. Thanks for all the eye candy! I would probably be inclined to make one large quilt. Even babies grow up eventually and they can enjoy that quilt for many years. I think both of those sashings give it texture. I can see a teenage young man really enjoying it. I also like the second one. I like how you are using the sashing and the strips. I can see why you have had that yardage for so long. You were waiting for the right thing to make with it. Even though it would be nice if you cut it up, I think it would make a nice backing. I am sure you have the appropriate scraps to compliment it!

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    1. I hadn't thought of making a larger quilt with these. I have so many and need some baby quilts. These tops are sewed so I doubt I'll go back but I'll remember the strength of the colors when I need some more throws.
      I have been waiting for a place to use this yardage but have never really sat down and planned something out. The colors are stronger than I recalled.

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  4. Do you still love the fabric or simply feel obligated to use it b/c it has been in the stash so long? If you love it, let it be the inspiration for a quilt you will keep (not gift). If you are ready for it to be gone, then back the baby quilts and move on. Let the new parents and babies enjoy it.

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    1. That's what I can't decide. I may take it to some stores to see what other fabrics go with it. Part of my problem is that nothing is as strong. Thanks for the great advice, Julie.

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  5. I have a couple fabrics in that same category, they definitely need to be used, though perhaps not in a baby quilt that will get rough treatment in the washing machine and dragged around on the floor. Also, being a batic, does it have the softness you want for a baby quilt? That fabric would make a fabulous border for a medallion quilt.

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    1. Good point. It's not very soft and probably won't survive all the rough treatment of a baby quilt.

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  6. this is a temporary feeling, that you've had it too long. I've had that feeling, like, "today's the day to do something, anything with this fabric" but don't be hasty. Not on a baby quilt meant to be soiled and washed, dragged around, thrown on the ground. Keep your batik and use something else. I think it's got possibilities for some repetitive block. If you haven't followed up on the K block then there are others that could use a strong graphic repeat to build on. I'd keep it a bit longer, buy some JoAnn's backing for $3 yard and turn your thoughts to a new design to repeat this bold graphic.

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    1. Good point, LeeAnna. I do get in "clear it out of here" mode. Sometimes I'm sorry I didn't really stop to figure out the best use. You're right. It won't work for a baby quilt that gets so much wear and tear.
      I've made so many Coin quilts recently because the demo is rescheduled for next month but I'm tired of them. So many "repeats" or more correctly, mild variations. There are other Coin ideas I want to try but I'd rather change my focus for a while. I'm certainly more appreciative of the prep work involved in teaching and see why they hang on to their examples so long. Ha.
      Thanks for helping me work this out. Definitely time to work on a new design.

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  7. I am always inspired by your coin quilts. So pretty!

    As for my thoughts on the batik, I say use it if it is what you have. There will probably still be some leftover for a future project. Especially if your stash is filled with other fabrics that inspires you more.

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    1. Thanks, Cynthia. I do like the colors of these quilts. It's interesting to see how to change the basic idea.
      I'm talking myself into different fabric for the back and working with this on a new idea.

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  8. Love the blue with the yellow, especially the last one. I would use the batik for a bag(s) that will show off the fabric. Or, if it really needs to be a quilt(s), cut fairly large center section for POW and surround it with borders of different fabrics.

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    1. Oh, Linda. I hadn't even considered bags. That would be very neat. Thanks.

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  9. if you split one row of the fabric into 3 strips (3 1/2" ? ) and use that between 4 columns of coins. the fractured curves would complement the straight lines of the coins.

    Or if you look at the convergent quilts, split the row into 3 or 4 different width strips between the columns of coins. I think it would really zing!

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    1. Two fabulous ideas, Paul. I like the idea of mixing straight lines from convergence with these curves.

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  10. Gosh, I love these quilts, Ann. I have a grandbaby arriving in November and his mom suggest a green quilt. I doubt I have time to make a quilt like these (because I'll be hand quilting it) but they would be perfect -- scrappy, bright, beautiful, inviting. What width are the strips?

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    1. This would be a great baby quilt, Nancy. Strong colors - which baby's are supposed to see better. It's easy to machine quilt this. Just stitch in the ditch along the columns then use straight line walking foot.
      Every strip is different but they range from 8" cuts to 3". The Coin heights are around 2" cut.

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  11. On the dark one...can't you use different fabrics between the columns if you can't decide on one? Or even piece together the sashing using different fabrics?

    That funky fabric you used for sashing on the other reminds me of peas in a pod. It's kind of weird but I like it.

    I wouldn't use that gorgeous batik for backing on these toddler quilts. And I wouldn't use it just because it is old and needs to be cleared out. (If you want it cleared out I'll give you my address ;-) )

    And I eat leftovers until they are gone! (If you want to toss leftovers I'll give you my address ;-) ).

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    1. I like the idea of different fabrics for sashing. Thanks, Cathy.
      I certainly wish I'd bought more of the green oval fabric. It's very unusual. I will miss it now that it's all gone. I'm going to work on some new ideas for the batik. It's not soft enough for a baby quilt - as several writers pointed out.
      I eat leftovers, too. But I'm happier now to only have two or three days of leftover rather than a week! We can get together for a leftovers party! ;-)

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  12. I love that blue and yellow fabric! I have used wax prints on the backs of large and small quilts. Sometimes the prints are too pretty to cut up so I put them on the back. I am sure you will figure out a great way of using it.

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    1. I go back and forth between trying to use it in a kaleidoscope and keeping it as is. I need to put my thinking cap on and see what fabrics will go with this.

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  13. Hey Ann,
    Really enjoying your coin quilts. As for that batik, is it too stiff for a skirt/dress/long vest? It is so striking I could not put that on the back of a quilt. How about pillows? It needs to be seen. And I too like the funky green pod fabric. I have grown to appreciate & enjoy funky unexpected fabrics in quilts - gives them personality!

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    1. Thanks for writing, Cindy. It's fairly thin. In fact, I think it would wrinkle a lot as clothing. We must be twins in taste. I love crazy fabrics and always check the sale bins first. One man's trash...

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  14. Your coin quilts are such a great way to use small amounts of fabric! Thanks for the inspiration, I’m adding that to my quilt list. It’s a lovely, unique fabric-I’d have it the showpiece of another quilt so that you can see it more.

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    1. I like to find different ways to use up the scraps and leftovers. This is the current design. I'm glad you like it, too. And I agree that the batik needs its own setting. Thanks for writing.

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  15. No opinion on the backing but just had to say how much I love that Pennsylvania Dutch saying! Too soon olt (sic) and too late smart! So true. I have it on a refrigerator magnet--the only one I've kept!

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    1. It's the story of my life. I wish I had a refrigerator magnet of this phrase. Thanks.

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