Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Chinese Coins IX Quilted

This is one of two similar quilts that were part of my Chinese Coin demonstration. Although they incorporate basically the same fabrics, they look {slightly} different. That makes them perfect for twins and I happen to know a family expecting some. It's time to finish these and gift them.

Chinese Coins IX quilt

Very simple walking foot quilting; parallel lines crossing the coins. I did SID between the columns and switched from yellow to blue thread to match the columns.

Chinese Coins IX quilting detail

Previous post:
  1. Using leftover Coins.
  2. Top sewn. 
  3. Starting the quilting.
Quilt Details
Size: 42" x 41"
Design: Chinese Coins
Batting: Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon100% cotton
Thread: blue and yellow Aurifil 50/2 cotton
Quilting: walking foot SID and parallel lines


Last week I attended Fern Royce's Working Small class at our guild. What a delightful day working on five techniques with an organized, friendly, and relaxed teacher. Fern sews improvisationally in different ways than I so it was a treat to learn new constructions techniques.

First we inserted a simple skinny curved strip {the middle sample.} Then we played with multiple skinny strips {on the left} and dancing squares {on the right.} All of these are small, no more than six inches wide.  One thing I learned was how much more carefully fabrics must be chosen when working so small.

Three samples from Working Small with Fern Royce
Additionally, I worked with these soft tans, something I haven't used in a while.

Fern teaches monthly at Bay Quilts where the work of her students is being featured this month.
Enjoy the day, Ann

33 comments:

  1. Your coins came out beautifully--just think that pea pod fabric is perfect and tickled me when I saw it. ;)))
    Nice work on that quilting...hugs, Julierose

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    1. You're right, Julie Rose. Peas in the pod. Hahaha.
      Seriously, I'm delighted these will go to twins. What fun.

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  2. What a fun quilt! The pea pod fabric is a hoot! Another finish - good job! That class looks like it would be such a great learning experience. Since Fern has probably made all the mistakes of piecing small and those fabulous skinny strips, learning from her would reduce the learning curve so you could incorporate the technique sooner into a project.

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    1. Fern's class was excellent: good points, calm and organized teacher. Everyone was kind; lots of sharing of color ideas, etc.
      And I'm so glad these tops are getting finished.

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  3. Perfection plus! It came out great, and just the right size! That sure is working small! Very impressive.

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    1. Thanks, Karen. These techniques will help with wall quilts. I do find that we need different fabrics on smaller quilts than on the large ones I usually make.

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  4. Two quilts that are the same but different will be perfect for twins. I really like the idea of working so small -it must make you look at fabrics quite differently. Do you think you will try these techniques in a quilt?

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    1. Yes, I don't think I could make two quilts exactly the same. This is as close as I can get.
      Sally Collins wrote several books years ago about working in very small scale. Something about precision piecing. Another point she made was how the fabric needs changed. My dancing squares are only 1/4-inch finished. I did use a plaid because I wanted to see how it would cut up. Better than I though.
      I'd only use these in a wall quilt or pillow. But... how many more bed quilts do I need? And crazy as I am, it's time to start padding the walls. Ha.

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  5. How appropriate is that pea pod fabric...twins are like two peas in a pod. Congrats on the finish. I like the straight line quilting. I can't imagine having twins around. One kid at a time was enough work for me.

    That looks like an interesting class. Everything looks good against that tan background.

    I was thinking of doing something like that middle class strip on my plat map quilt for the river.

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    1. Don't you love it when serendipity happens? I'm delighted these are heading to a new home. And like you, one at a time is enough for me... even though others survive.
      Using the strip seems like a good idea for a map quilt. I'm still struggling with how to translate ideas to fabric even though I made a small first sample. It's a good stretch to try something hard.

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  6. Love the pea pods! This quilt has such an oriental look at my eyes, aside from the pea pods of course! Guess that's why they're called Chinese Coins.

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  7. this is a great series... just so cool what one can do with the theme. I like the parallel quilting lines a lot.

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    1. Thanks, LeeAnna. Parallel quilting has become my default on Coins. My fabrics are so loud already. While the lines are utilitarian, they show up well without competing.

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  8. Great finish, they'll be appreciated!
    And the skinny strips and dancing squares are exciting.
    Just think what you could do with those.

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    1. Babies do find ways to use quilts, don't they?
      You could really do exciting things with these techniques. I need to put some more thought into them... right after I clear my backlog of tops. Haha.

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  9. I really like this new take in your Chinese Coins series. I just finished organizing my scraps so I may have to play and create some chinese coins soon!

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    1. Your Coin quilt with applique was an inspiration to me. Can't wait to see what you do next.
      And of course, your scraps are organized. But mine are in motion {going into quilt tops rapidly.}

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  10. Very clever on the coin quilt...it is lovely.

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    1. Thanks. Making two similar was interesting. I'm glad there's a good use for them.

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  11. Another lovely coin quilt version. Perfect for twins with the pea pod fabric! I've loved your theme of coin quilts, it's so interesting, how different and yet the same they all are!

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    1. Thank you, Linda. It's a relief to be actively quilting these tops and gifting them. That pea pod fabric has been surprisingly useful; I wish I'd bought more. It was definitely a wild child fabric.
      I never thought this design would engage me as long as it has. It's a great way to play with scraps and I enjoy the subtle differences that arise.

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  12. This reminds me of a class I took with Lynn Carson Harris - working improvisationally with solids on a small scale. My little quilt Something Fishy came from that beginnings.

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    1. I looked Lynn up. What colorful quilts. I'll bet you learned lots in her class.

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  13. I love the little class samples. They are wonderful and the Chinese coins is a lovely quilt as well.

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    1. The samples are lots of fun. I'm mulling over what I can make of them... after I finish this round of quilting. It's so nice to move quilts out when you know they will be well loved.

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  14. Wonderful to have another finish! Your stitching is spot on as usual! Loving that large scale yellow/white gingham fabric so much....

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    1. Yes! I've enjoyed your recent finishes, too. It's that time of year. Not just the holidays, but the end of the year is a book closing. So I usually find things to complete about now.
      I bought the buffalo check on a whim. Of course it was on sale because no one {including me} quite knew how to incorporate something that large. Intimidating. But it cut up beautifully here. Now I'd like more.

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  15. Beautiful Chinese Coins Ann and I love the straight line quilting, I'm a huge fan!
    Lucky you taking a class with Fern Royce, I admire her quilting very much indeed and so interesting to see your samples.

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    1. Thanks, Maureen. Sometimes the straight line seems boring but it works so well here. I'm becoming more and more fond of utility quilting. It just works.
      I know I'm fortunate to live near so many excellent teachers and quilt shops. I try to take advantage of the opportunities - even when there doesn't seem to be enough time. However, online classes are an intriguing option. I've seen some exciting ones lately.

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  16. oh man, I am in love with those small pieces.

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    1. It may make me work small for a while. Wouldn't that be a kick?

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  17. I want those! The techniques, I mean, but you can send the actual pieces if you just don't have a use. Hahaha
    I hadn't really thought about the need to pay close attention to fabric and color when working with skinny strips. I have a "throw everything at the wall and see what sticks" mentality.

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