Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Well Basted; Finally Finished

This quilt was basted two years ago. At that time the sashing was SID but I never could decide how to quilt it. Finally I hung it neatly alongside some tops where it remained until this week. Enough! Propellers turn so they make spiraling air currents and that's a good enough design.

The more I fret about quilting, the more I try to "match" it to the fabric prints. So I considered tracing those large circles, small daisies, and wavy lines. Too constrained. Too many thread changes. The spiral looks cleaner and more effective.

Baby quilt with two sizes of airplane propellers and orange flying geese on dark blue sashing.
Propeller baby quilt

The only problem was the center of the spiral. It's very hard to turn the quilt smoothly in such a tiny radius. I have used FMQ in the center and switched to the walking foot when the circle was larger but it's hard to enough keep the spacing the same with one foot. It's almost impossible with two different feet. Marking a spiral wasn't a good option this time because my marking pens blended into the print.

Because the diameter was too small for a walking foot, the original quilting in the center is not well aligned.
Original spiral quilting
in the center is not well aligned

I resewed it by simply following the printed design of the center. The spiraling starts at the edge of the center circle. The lines still have some irregularities but those are much less obvious.

Center is re-quilted by following the print with a walking foot and transitioning to a spiral when the diameter is larger.
Center is quilted by following
the print with a walking foot

Then I pulled fabric for the binding. Lots and lots of fabrics. Red, blue, light blue, grey, white, striped. You name it; I tried it. Most were too harsh. The pale grey striped border called for a light- colored binding. Here are three of my final ideas. The black at the bottom made a very severe line as did all those strong blues and reds. I liked the grey and yellow but preferred the soft blue with orange-red flowers... even though it looks like a 30's reproduction print. It ties to the center better.

Light blue, yellow, and black prints are laid out as possible bindings.
Binding choices for Propeller baby quilt

The back is a soft twill-like weave in baby pink that was a bit wider than normal so it didn't need piecing. I wish I knew the name of the weave. It drapes beautifully; not a bit stiff like my idea of twill.

The light blue print makes a quiet binding that does not compete with the quilt blocks.
Binding detail of Propeller baby quilt

One more detail photo. Without realizing it,  Propeller baby quilt is a small exercise in scale change, too. Woo-hoo; invitation met - even if it is a bit late.

The large center propeller block has four fussy cut blades with medallions. It is surrounded by orange flying geese on bright blue as sashing.
Propeller baby quilt detail

Previous posts:
  1. Leftover blocks
  2. Designing the top
  3. Basted and ready to quilt

Quilt Details
Size: 44" x 44"
Designs: Airplane Propellers and Flying Geese
Batting: Mountain Mist 100% cotton
Thread: Gutterman 50 wt cotton, grey on front, pink on back
Quilting: SID and Spiral with walking foot

Enjoy the day, Ann

36 comments:

Frédérique said...

Your Propeller quilt is a beauty! 😍Great spiral design quilting, and good idea for the center 😉

patty a. said...

Congratulations for getting this one finished; it turned out wonderful! The light binding looks perfect on this quilt. I still must try spiral quilting.

Marie said...

What a great quilt! Love how you've quilted it (gotta try this some time). Those flying geese added to the mix really work well with it, and your fabrics are to die for.

Julierose said...

this is amazing--your quilting came out so well--I like the wind currents idea a lot--nice work --beautiful
colors in this--
congrats on a finish and figuring it out....sometimes i think that is the hardest part...;000
hugs, Julierose

Juliana said...

Although wrapping a baby up is a great use for this quilt, I think it is more likely to become wall art. It is just beautiful, and I can imagine it giving great pleasure for years and years on someone's living room or bedroom wall. Maybe after many years, it would be taken down to wrap the original owner's first grandchild. I'm so glad you shared the photos and process.

LA Paylor said...

I love hearing about the decision making process. When we see a finished quilt we think, of course it has a spiral or a circle, or concentric lines, not that the maker had to make decisions along the way! It is interesting to look at as are all your quilts, with a lot of movement. A baby sure would like to focus on each pattern.

audrey said...

I had forgotten about this one! It's beautiful. So joyful and fun looking. LOVE the value change in the flying geese and how it adds even more movement throughout the quilt! This is such a 'you' quilt, just wonderful. I am loving your spiral stitching too, no matter how imperfect it may look to you.

Pamela said...

Super finish!

Quilting Babcia said...

Your spiral quilting is the perfect touch for this wonderful quilt. It would
make a fabulous wall hanging where it could be seen without baby drool all over it, not that I have anything against baby's quilts, but this one is really special!

Mel Beach said...

The spiral quilting is perfect for the propeller blocks---really recreates the movement of propellers!!

Mystic Quilter said...

Wow I love this little quilt!! Great fabrics, movement and quilting. The circles are a perfect choice. Congratulations on a stunning finish Ann.

Cathy said...

I like everything about this one...the block, the fabrics, the colors, the quilting...Congrats on the spectacular finish.

I always struggle as to how to quilt and what color thread to use so like to see how others make the decisions.

Quiltdivajulie said...

I am with you on the debate over how to quilt a finished top -- I spend WAAAAY too much time pondering when, like your propellers, the answer is really quite simple (I just try to make it too complicated). LOVELY finish -- some very lucky baby (and its parents) will be thrilled with this quilt.

Linda @ kokaquilts said...

A great quilt! I love the additional flying geese, and your overall colour combo. I'm seeing quite a few similer ideas lately, but with straight lines not curved, (Susan from patchworknplay has been busy making her 'boston common' blocks and there's a popular pattern called 'tussie mussie' by christine vlasic that is very similer too).

Preeti said...

Carefully chosen fabrics, a gorgeous pattern, perfectly executed and the quilting could not be more appropriate. A spectacular finish!!! How I'd love to get my hands on your scraps :-)

Janie said...

Congratulations, fabulous finish. Great piecing, quilting and contrast.
I like reading your thoughts on your choices, inspiring.
The binding fabric opens the whole design.

Ann said...

What a relief to get this one finished. Hanging it for so long added some creases and stretched areas which were tricky to resolve. Spiral quilting is fun; just make sure you don’t pull on the bias.

Ann said...

How kind of you, Marie. I enjoyed making the top. It’s always fun to mix fabrics with abandon.

Ann said...

Thank you for writing, Frédérique. I hope you use the idea and information I. Your quilting some time.

Ann said...

I agree that choosing a quilting design is the most difficult part. The older I get the more I lean to simple designs.

Ann said...

That’s a delightful idea, Juliana. I’ll have to think about who might want a wall quilt.

Ann said...

This is why I prefer blogging. We makers like to discuss our thoughts, efforts, and results. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to talk with one of the masters about why they chose a certain color, lighting, or brushstroke? It certainly adds to my understanding to read why you used a certain technique.
It’s always good to hear from you. What did you think of the monster light show a few nights ago? Did it get to Denver? It was amazing to the south.

Ann said...

I had almost forgotten it, too. Or I psyched myself out about the quilting since I kept making the designs more and more intricate. I do like these simpler repetitive designs these days.

Ann said...

Thanks, Pamela.

Ann said...

Thanks for writing. You all make me think it needs a home on someone’s wall. I just know I’d like to see it myself occasionally and that colors my thoughts on the recipient.

Ann said...

Thanks, Mel. I wanted to do something intricate like you but this was what worked for me.

Ann said...

Thanks, Maureen. Making the top was delightful but it took a while to decide on quilting,

Ann said...

Thanks, Cathy. It's always interesting how others handle those decisions. Grey was the best choice to cover all those fabrics.

Ann said...

We are so alike, Julie. I can drive myself crazy with the quilting.

Ann said...

It is interesting to see block design progressions. I looked at the blogs you mentioned and they are some I should follow. What fun. Thanks.

Ann said...

You are so kind, Preeti. Most of these scraps are gone. They go to the scrap bag and then to Coin (or other) quilts. You have beautiful fabrics yourself which must mean we have similar taste.

Ann said...

Thanks for writing, Janie. Reading each others' thoughts is the best part of blogging. Thanks for confirming the binding; most are darker but this needed something light. If I knew it would bea wall quilt I would have faced it rather than bound it.

QuiltGranma said...

perfect choice for quilting that quilt.

Ann said...

Thanks.

Kaja said...

I have always loved your propeller blocks. Two of your choices ring true for me: I find I am often drawn to lighter bindings now, whereas once I tended to use darker fabrics. I like how they expand the feel of the quilt (if that makes sense?) I also think that on the whole the simpler quilting options work best for those of us who use lots and lots of fabrics in our work, pulling everything together rather than adding an extra, disparate element.

Ann said...

Light bindings seem to work for some of my newer quilts, especially like yours when they make the edge open and free. After years trying to make fancy FMQ, I am realizing it will never show on the busy prints I like. And I like prints most. Parallel-style quilting (echo, etc) show up on prints but not much else. As you point out, the fancy stitching looks disparate rather than unifying.